Grayson Perry’s Anthropolical Artistic Adventures

I confess, I have struggled to come up with a good Jubilee themed post – somewhat woeful for someone who made the royals central to their academic career as a student. So instead I will blog about the reason why on the first day back from the long break I am exhausted; it’s because I stayed up late to watch Grayson Perry’s programme on Channel 4.
 
In The Best Possible Taste saw Grayson Perry Turner prize winning artist travel to Sunderland to look at working class culture and then transform what he learnt into a new collection of tapestries looking at the correlation between class and taste.
 
The programme for me was fascinating in two ways first it was looking topics I think many would shy away from in programme making looking at class and tastes in a non judgemental sensitive way as well as being willing to get involved. All I can say is Grayson you scrub up more glamorous than I do for a night out! It was fascinating looking at the anthropology of the proletarian north east of england.
 
Secondly I was fascinated with seeing how Grayson was able to take the observations and experiences and turn them into pieces of art with influences of Hogarth and religious works. Each artist works in an individual way and see the process and journey Perry goes on was facinating.

The final results for me were engaging, exciting and a riot of colour. As someone who struggles with modern art Grayson has never made me as a voyeur of his art feel like I am not getting it – it is what you see is what you get and its visually exciting. There is a keen sense of observation and humour that taps into my soul.
 
I have to say I am now looking forward to the next 2 parts and see how the tapestries progress and the observations Grayson picks up on with middleclass yummy mummies.
 
Also if you enjoyed this post please check out my other post on Grayson called A Dish ofArtistic Humble Pie https://historianlaura.wordpress.com/2011/12/02/a-dish-of-artistic-humble-pie/ please check it out.

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