Fashion Rules: Kensington Palace

Victoria's statue outside Kensington Palace

Victoria’s statue outside Kensington Palace

Ok for a long time I have wanted to go to KensingtonPalace and when my friend Clare came to town it was a great excuse especially as we both have art fund cards so entry is free.

Like banqueting house the rooms of the palace aren’t crammed with lots of furniture they allow you to enjoy the scope of the architecture and the period designs. There were a rich array of clothes worn by Victoria and Albert which formed the permanent exhibition spaces the most beautiful being the wedding dress worn by Victoria. She was so dinky, petite and slender no bigger than a weedy teenager in size by modern standards. One can only imagine what all those babies did to her poor body. The rooms were beautifully decorated and atmospheric. Please be warned that if you visit when it is very hot it is like a sauna!

Victorias Wedding Dress

Victorias Wedding Dress

But it was the temporary exhibition that really blew me away. Fashion ruled was a collection of frocks worn by HRH Elizabeth II, her late sister the ever so chic Princess Margaret, and the late Princess Diana who also lived in the palace.

Beautiful 50s summer frock worn by the Queen very pretty

Beautiful 50s summer frock worn by the Queen very pretty

I think it is fare to say that Princess Margaret was a beautiful woman and so chic. She knew what her fashion style was it was pure glamour for a party princess.

Love Princess Margrets taste I would so waer this coat

Love Princess Margrets taste I would so waer this coat

There were 5 iconic dresses belonging to Princess Diana they were of course evening gowns but she was a lady that liked sparkle.

Red Frock worn by Lady Diana

Red Frock worn by Lady Diana

The shop was not as big or varied as the ones at WindsorCastle or the Tower of London but still perfectly formed and I recommend the little café selling refreshments.

A lovely way to spend a few hours and it comes highly recommended.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Art, culture, Exhibitions, History and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s